How To Hide A Body Properly

It has to be asked. You’ve wondered about this too, right? Don’t be afraid. You’re among friends here. When I was starting out, resources were few and far between. No one showed anything to me. I had to teach myself and make it up as I went along. So, without prejudice, let me tell you the things I learned on the way to becoming a successful serial killer.

Basically, I’m lazy. It’s a character flaw. I’ve never wanted to dig a hole. In the early days, I’d always take the easy way out and find a ditch or a drain. I was so naïve. It kinda makes me laugh today. I was so foolish. I could’ve been caught. Fortunately, luck was with me. Rain fell sometime between the moment I dumped a body and when it was found. I didn’t plan it that way, it just happened. Any evidence I may have left on a body was conveniently washed away. I learned how to improve my ways by refining the process and using the weather to assist my cause.

There are other ways to dispose of bodies, but many of them require effort. Some are simply bad for the environment. This brings me to my way.

There is another way. My way. It comes down to two primary things: 1) Location and 2) Timing. There is a third, but I’ll come back to that.

In the USA, there are 92 people per square mile. That’s 184 eyes looking around that mile at any one time. It’s almost impossible to do anything without someone knowing or photographing it. Get it wrong and it’s all over.

My killing ground has a much lower population density. There’s just 1 person in that same square mile. As a result of this wonderful statistic, I don’t do much with the bodies. I leave them where they fall and let nature do the rest. It works fine. In ten years, I’ve not been caught, and it’s an environmentally friendly practice… but I still choose my times and places for kills very carefully.

The summers are stiflingly hot and humid in my home town of Brisbane. A body that’s open to the climate decomposes fast. If I pick the right night to commit a murder, say, before a drenching thunderstorm, I find that it sorts out most of the evidence immediately. Once the washing is done, all that’s left to finish off the job is some time under a scorching sun. Assuming the body isn’t found at all, it then dissolves into the landscape quick.

And then there are the victims I choose. I go for strangers. They’re nothing to me. They have no historical associations with anything I do or have done. We cross paths one time and that’s it. There aren’t any chain of links to follow, not any that would be obvious anyway.

The Bikeway-Rapist gave me the right idea. He got away with his folly for a long time. Police had no clue who was doing those woman. He made it simple by keeping them random.

But he did two things wrong. He did it in daylight and then he let his victims live. Sure, it’s fine to help yourself to dessert, but it’s important to not get caught eating it! The one set of eyes in that square mile that saw everything remained alive. All it took was someone’s great memory and a good description to change the game for our bikeway rapist.

The moral of this story is: Don’t worry about how to hide a body, look at the kill location and choose the right victim.

Pure Evil and Kindness

Kill strangers in desolate places and let them drop just before the rain falls. -A

“Forman’s writing style is artful, with the protagonist Mitchell’s warped thought processes masterfully exposed. The author has a powerful and vivid command of language and his word pictures are stark and disturbingly real.”

– Linda J Bettenay, author of ‘Secrets Mothers Keep’ and ‘Wishes For Starlight’.

Another Mystery Death Found ‘Not Accidental’ – Dark Fiction by M.Forman.

A thirty-five-year-old woman was hung by her camera’s strap, another unknown victim was found naked in long grass, by Meadowbrook TAFE students. A third, yet-to-be-identified body, was discovered by joggers near a water storage facility — a common link being all three deaths occurring during nights of thunderstorms.

Three Deaths Investigation - Police Walk Bushland
Investigations Continue.

Nina de Jong’s death is a turning point in this story’s narrative. She’s the one found dead in her own backyard. There are glass shards surrounding her muddied body, and police claim she may have been raped before she died. It’s difficult to be certain. Vital evidence is destroyed by a night of torrential downpours.

We realise there is a change in the method of Nina’s murder. This killing is more personal than the others. It’s a clue the media overlooks as it charges forward with a sensationalised serial rape and murder villain narrative. It skews the official investigation too and misleads a fearful public that’s keen to take a killer off the streets.

There were clues that could’ve led to the truth.

Sarah Foley wasn’t always a Foley. A long time ago, she went by another name Long-forgotten childhood sweethearts rarely look recognisable as aged adults thirty years later. Wrinkles and body fat alter our appearances. Marriages change their names. Samantha should’ve listened to her husband when he suspected something he saw in the news. The killings could’ve stopped right then and there. They didn’t.

Maxine’s demise was easily explained away. She was an attention seeker. Investigators labelled her death to be a misadventure and closed the case.

But then there was Nina, that sweet blonde and single mother trying to put her life back together after a messy and violent divorce. She wanted her affair to be kept a secret.

Two lovers embrace
Nina’s Secret Affair Partner

Her friends and family knew nothing of her new relationship with the stranger. She’d barely told herself. The attention she received was amazing, and that’s what mattered most. If it was to be a brief affair, then let it be as intense as it should be. She deserved some happiness anyway.

Hand over woman's mouth
She’ll die.

Our murderer and mysterious lover become conscious of each other at this juncture. Nina is the key victim, but no one in her neighbourhood heard those glass doors shatter. Her screams were lost to the storm too. According to those who were interviewed, she was seeing no one at all.

We discover in SEETHINGS that, for some killers, murder is a form of escape.

It’s not about revenge.

Revenge is yet to come.

Creep you later,

Michael Forman

Michael Forman (Author of SEETHINGS)

Five Random Victims
Summer Thunderstorms
Charm Bracelet
Author: M.Forman
Avail: Kindle, Kobo, Etc eBook

Murder On The Ocean – Fine Dark Fiction

Accidents happen. When they occur at sea, things turn bad fast. It’s a dangerous world on the waves. If someone falls overboard, they can go missing without a trace. There are few witnesses to recount what actually happened, and there isn’t even a body to inspect for evidence. Distance, drift, salt-water and sharks, often makes one disappear.

Suspicion often surround man-overboard situations, but who’s to deny an accident? Who can disprove it is there’s no evidence to the contrary? A rolling ocean, water across the gunwales and slippery decks, are the right combination of circumstances that can cause such an outcome to occur. It’s a regular situation on a boat. Accidents aren’t unusual. Each month, somewhere in the world, a person disappears from a vessel and their body is never found. It’s true.

Sailing a small yacht comes with special challenges.

A yacht has ropes, wires, sails and many moving parts. If the weather turns foul, it affects the boat in substantial ways. A wave can easily crawl over its deck, tip the boat, wet every surface and cause a boom to swing violently from one side of the yacht to the other. An unaware crew member can be clouted by it, catapulted clear across the cockpit, and then be sent directly into the sea.

Sometimes an encouraging push will do it.

Landlubbers are aware of the perils-at-sea by reading sailor biographies. It gives them some insight, but there’s still a great gap between reading, watching from a shore and what happens between the white-caps.

There is also the nice one that appears in romance fiction. It’s a cute, fuzzy version of yachting. Golden sunsets, salt-kissed skin, blue waters and island paradises — is the dreamy alternative. This fairy tale has helped to attract a certain type of person to try out sailing later in life. It’s the kind of character I like to write into my dark fiction.

Scarborough Marina, Redciffe

Single life in my late 30’s gave me a unique insight to the kinds of people who gravitate to yachting later in life. Recently detached women, many moving towards their second lives, weren’t afraid to invite themselves onto a sailor’s yacht, so they could see and experience something new.

Blending the sailing world with the second-life dating scene makes for an interesting study of interpersonal relationships. Quite often, an unhappy past life provides significant motivation to make the most of a brand new one. Love on a yacht moves quick and is deeply passionate. Unfortunately, some second-lifers haven’t ended their first-life marriages before stepping out on their spouses. They’ll keep secrets from everyone, including themselves, to feel good about themselves again. This secretive female is my protagonist’s perfect victim.

There’s no escaping a long sea voyage if the yacht’s skipper turns out to be a serial killer. And there’s no need for police to look for a missing person on the water if there isn’t a history of one being aboard a yacht.

Tanned bodies, sex and chardonnay is but half of the sailing story. The other half is about being surrounded by an abyss and unable to reach land when you desperately need it. This is the muse I used when writing the sequel to SEETHINGS, SEETHINGS 2.

You can pick up an eBook from Smashwords to start reading it right away. Just click on the book below!

Michael Forman (Author)


A Sailing Affair
Two Random Victims
Childless Couple
Charm Bracelet
Author: M.Forman
Avail: eBook

‘Forman’s writing style is artful, with the protagonist Mitchell’s warped thought processes masterfully exposed. The author has a powerful and vivid command of language and his word pictures are stark and disturbingly real.’

Linda J Bettenay, author of ‘Secrets Mothers Keep’ and ‘Wishes For Starlight’

Scarborough Harbor - Australia
Life on the water.