The Perfect Happy Ever After Story Can Be Found Inside This Dark Fiction

Everyone loves a happy ending. Even the darkest of stories have one if you know where to look for it. It’s a time when villains become heroes and it’s cool for them to do evil deeds. The trick in locating the dark fiction HEA is to skew your head sideways. Conventional thinking won’t help you locate it in the obvious places. You must first allow the darkness to flow over you so it can smother out orthodoxy and open up your mind.

There are millions of authors on social media who write vanilla HEA’s for traditional HEA fans. HEA comforts readers. Fans know that by the close of the book, any crazy world made inside it will always end in one place, happy. It makes HEA fans feel safe — like pulling up a cosy blanket on a cold Winter’s night.

It got me thinking, I write HEA’s too. My evil narratives end in happy places! Sure they do.

Stop laughing.

It’s a fact. My characters flounder like any HEA character. They doubt themselves. They love, hate, inspire-to-do-better, fail and succeed — just like any HEA character would do. There are winners and losers. And every dark story I’ve ever written comes with a profound, life-affirming resolution at its conclusion. Yes, I know, I offer readers a scratchy HEA blanket, but who said all blankets are soft?

evil eye

A criminal’s version of happy-ever-after would be different to yours and mine. It’d be no less important (to them) but it would be a new challenge to create a good one as a writing exercise. Taking their viewpoint would allow a writer to explore their life goals, their hurdles, ups-and-downs, and all the foibles that come with living their kind of life.

For instance, not going to jail would be one of the criminal’s best HEA’s, right?

This type of HEA would be a hard-sell to those who firmly believe bad people should be punished. Jail time or a death sentence is the only satisfactory outcome for those who commit heinous acts on others.

Remember TV’s Dexter?

Now there’s a likeable bad guy who managed to get millions of fans on-side. The show was one part psycho-killer, three parts Equaliser. Dexter killed people but his victims were evil people too. They were paedophiles, murderers, etc — the worst of the worst. We liked watching our deranged, yet well-controlled killer, police society’s filth with his sharp knife and oodles of transparent plastic film taped to the walls and floors of his home. He became a judge, jury, and an excellent executioner. It’s an unconventional HEA.

See? It can be done.

This writer’s greatest challenge is to create new narratives using the HEA as a starting point — and then to develop them from evil’s perspective. I invite readers to experience them, so they too can become dark HEA believers by The End — the perfect HEA for my kind of adult fiction.

Michael

Five women’s bodies are discovered after the nights of thunderstorms. Their spouses are suspected of the crimes, but it becomes clear that someone else is responsible. There’s no blood and few clues. A storm photographer who specializes in taking pictures of lightning may be the only witness.

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Genetic Fingerprinting Wasn’t Always A Reliable Tool For Fighting Crime. DNA’s Transitional Period Was Incorporated Into This Dark Fiction Narrative.

Today’s crime-solving is easy. You take a swab of some icky stuff left at the scene of a crime, do something science-y with it, and a mystery gets solved. A bad guy goes to jail. Everyone sleeps at night. Perfect. It’s the happy-ever-after we expect for crime events.

We assume that DNA sequencing has been with us forever but it hasn’t. In fact, there are countries in this world where DNA science doesn’t exist at all. Technology and knowledge aren’t equally shared around this globe of ours.

And then there’s that wonderful moment in history when DNA science arrived in our own country and city. It was brand new but not yet perfected. At that point, genetic sequencing was super expensive, time-consuming and didn’t always yield the same results twice. It was unreliable. We liked what it promised to do but couldn’t trust it. A hair follicle, saliva, or semen, wasn’t enough to convict a criminal in court. This meant some of them got away with murder.

I wrote a novel where one criminal committed a heinous crime before the process of DNA matching became a perfected science. They lived well after it’d been accepted into Criminal Law. Someone else finds some good, DNA evidence on an old love letter and then makes a threat to reveal a long-hidden truth by sending it to a crime lab. It’s blackmail by DNA — a different angle on the DNA component of crime narratives. (My story isn’t exclusively about DNA. The cover of the book confirms this.) This transitional period when DNA science didn’t exist, and then did, is an alluringly grey area for this writer. It intrigues me a lot. It makes me wonder how many real-life criminals are out there just waiting for a knock to come on their door for something they did pre-DNA science.

SEETHINGS could be seen as a true murder story as its details feel alarmingly real. If that’s the case, then we’ve something to genuinely fear about the normal citizens of this world. Such a criminal could be your neighbour or the person sitting opposite you in a coffee shop. You couldn’t tell if they’re a killer by looking at them. You’d have to take a sample of their genetic fingerprint to a lab, and then run it through an unsolved crime database, to know for sure.

Now here’s a twist of an idea: Take a sample of your own DNA to that lab. Wouldn’t it be funny if your DNA profile matched one that appears in an unsolved crime? That’d shock you, right? You’d deny it, of course. You didn’t do it. After all, like my protagonist, you’re a decent, kind person. And you’d remember committing such a crime, wouldn’t you?

What if you’d genuinely forgotten about committing it? First, you’d have to be convinced you did it. Let’s assume you are already convinced, the next thing you’d want to know is why and how you came to forget. What was so traumatic that you failed to remember committing murder?

Is someone setting you up or are you simply going mad?

That’s also SEETHINGS.

-Michael Forman

Five women’s bodies are discovered after the nights of thunderstorms. Their spouses are suspected of the crimes, but it becomes clear that someone else is responsible. There’s no blood and few clues. A storm photographer who specializes in taking pictures of lightning may be the only witness.

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Intimate Murder: Villain and Victim Development

When writing dark fiction, it’s important to create the perfect villain. Without one, a hero can’t rise above and give the reader what they need — hard justice. A hero’s strength depends on the power of the villain to get them there. Justice aside, there’s one other thing to consider.

The victim.

Simply using random individuals as victims certainly quickens part of the writing process. It can give our bad-guy instant badness and we don’t need to know about a victim’s life, learn their name, or visit a funeral. We can spend more time with the villains and heroes in the story. But using a nameless nobody to die at the hands of the best-crafted bad-guy, can ruin a good dark fiction story.

Why not include some intrigue by selecting the perfect victim for our villain? If the so-called randoms don’t turn out to be that random at all, we could give deeper purpose to each kill — discoverable later in the story.

And what about the manner in which they die?

Murder is highly personal — at least, I believe it is. Nothing is more intimate than making one of my character’s life snuff out. It’d be easy to under-value a good murder by failing to honour murder’s intimacy. For instance: A shooting. There’s a crack of a gun, a fall to the knees, and a body hits the ground — all done, nice and quick. If the villain is a sniper, it’s even less intimate, because it’s done from a distance. He doesn’t even have to see the eyes of his victim fade. Where’s the intimacy in a sniper-kill?

My murder is not the kind that comes by way of a gun, or a knife, or poison. I’m talking about something deeply intimate — like the electricity that crackles between two new lovers.

Theirs is all about erotic anticipation, hot kisses, fingers and hands seeking bare flesh. Only eyes, moans, and heavy breathing, is used to guide their way into the bedroom. A murder can be written into this space instead. It can be just as sensual, building towards a steamy homicide, creating a whole new level of creep for the dark narrative.

I’m a writer who yearns to bring intimacy and murder together. I want a reader to want to witness the development of such a relationship and then rise as their union climaxes. And then I want them shocked by what I do next.

Avoid clichés at all costs.

Clichés take us where we expect to go. There’s nothing left to do but to wrap a story up with a justice bow and let the reader off with a feel-good outcome. The only challenge for a writer, is to become creative in hiding the cliché, while writing it. For instance: Bad guy goes to jail, dies, banished forever, turned into stone, becomes a horrible monster, etc. The result is always the same — the evil never stays. It goes away, always. Predictable. Not in my stories.

Should justice be as predictable?

You’d think it’d be black and white. Once the badness is identified, it’s removed by good, old fashioned justice. But justice is subjective. Depending on your age, race, upbringing, beliefs, sex, sexual preference, intellect, wisdom, experience, even weight and height, you’ll have a unique view on what’s just. There’s another human flaw to factor into the justice mix — psychological stability. There are moments when we’re not ourselves and make bad decisions on things like justice. All of these varying elements in the justice process make it somewhat fluidic. This fluidity is something I like to explore in my stories. All I need to do is get my reader to jump in and get wet with me, to find appropriate justice in the sloppy liquid. It’s not conventional but it works for the thriller-styled novels I write.

Self awareness, identity and acceptance is important to everyone, including psychopaths. We all have an inner-something that drives us and makes us do the things we do. Even well-balanced people can get things horribly wrong on matters of love, lust, family, money, and much more. Any of these items can be motivators for us to think and act inappropriately, and then look to cover our tracks when we see things in the light of a new day.

My books include this strange shift in behaviour. They are dark fiction and not meant for children. They’re not for simple souls either. They contain complex, adult issues, and challenge a reader’s moral standing throughout their narratives. They are written for a perfect villain who commits an intimate murder, and then ask readers to accept a different type of justice that makes perfect sense, only at the time of the crime.

Read SEETHINGS now. It’s the first novel in a series, and it’s free on *SMASHWORDS. (*limited time)

Michael Forman (Author)

“Forman’s writing style is artful, with the protagonist Mitchell’s warped thought processes masterfully exposed. The author has a powerful and vivid command of language and his word pictures are stark and disturbingly real.”

– Linda J Bettenay, author of ‘Secrets Mothers Keep’ and ‘Wishes For Starlight’.

Character Spotlight: Maxine Sewell. (Dark Fiction Dissection)

Maxine heads a group of small business owners who specialise in photographing weddings. Most of the newer, inexperienced photographers who are breaking into this field, see her as an authority figure and look up to her for guidance. Those who have been around much longer know that they are mistaken to look up to her for anything.

Maxine Sewell.

  • Early thirties
  • Single but on/off again relationship with Andrew
  • Wedding photographer
  • Loves going to parties
  • Central figure to the photography industry
  • Enjoys red wine and Champagne

Her Rubenesque form and aggressive personality helps her get her messages across. No one can out-do Maxine’s vitriol or volume once the wine flows. She can drink anyone under a table or out-argue them over it. Nothing stops Maxine when a party is in full swing.

As a photographer, she isn’t creative or even all that successful, but she certainly is loud. She’s a rambunctious woman whose abruptness is often mistaken as confidence, but it often disguises what little she actually knows about photography. Bridge burning is her only real talent — as once her bluff is exposed and that facade falls, she turns nasty quickly.

Andrew is another photographer. He’s from the northern suburbs and has an efficient business on his side of town. It’s no secret that he and Maxine are seeing each other. He’s playing her, calling on the big girl when no one else is available. He makes it clear that he wants to remain single — and he’ll say it to her face when everyone’s listening. Maxine says she doesn’t care and the friends-with-benefits arrangement works well for her. It’s not true. She’s lonely and everyone knows it. No one believes her, not even Andrew. He’ll just smile and pour her another glass of Merlot. Maxine will be there for him anytime he needs her, no matter how much it hurts her to wait.

And then there’s Mitchell, another eligible male photographer who lives and works much closer to Maxine. She’s been watching him through a separate lens, wondering if he could be the one. Unlike the rest of her male-colleagues who are either too old, too broken, or incapable of holding a meaningful conversation, he’s the only guy she’s willing to try. He seems nice enough, but he’s refused her, twice. She knows he’s married, but she’s also seen him dating other women. It doesn’t make sense. Why won’t he accept her offers. She’s good enough. And why won’t he tell her what’s going on with his wife? Maxine needs to be informed at all costs!

She hates men keeping secrets from her. She’ll find out what’s going on with Mitchell even if it kills her!

SEETHINGS is written with a happy ever ending after you won’t forget.

Michael

“Forman’s writing style is artful, with the protagonist Mitchell’s warped thought processes masterfully exposed. The author has a powerful and vivid command of language and his word pictures are stark and disturbingly real.”

– Linda J Bettenay, author of ‘Secrets Mothers Keep’ and ‘Wishes For Starlight’.

Former Teacher Walks A Dangerous Path While Concealing A Dark Secret

As police search his residence for evidence, counselor and popular radio identity, Tony Brindell, continues to deny that he ever had a relationship or acted inappropriately with one of his students when he was her high school teacher thirteen years ago.

‘I’m not a pedophile. I’m Christian’ He told the waiting media.

Tracey Logan, now twenty-seven, has previously claimed that Brindell seduced her when she was just fourteen. A second woman has also come forward, revealing intimate details of a long term affair she says she had with Brindell when she was only thirteen.

Brindell and his lover, Logan

The women’s claims have become the focus of a historical probe into Brindell’s personal and professional life. Brindell, a well-respected Pastor, youth worker, counselor, and media celebrity, has not yet been charged, but investigations are ongoing.


Originally, Tony Brindell wasn’t written into SEETHINGS to be a pedophile. He was meant to be a kind, Christian man who simply helped people who were in trouble. As I wrote more of him into the story, I had to follow his life path back to when he wasn’t a Pastor, but a teacher. That’s when I discovered that there was a monster inside him.

Did I mention that my writing is dark?

(More of Tony’s character is found here.)

-Michael (Author of SEETHINGS)

“Forman’s writing style is artful, with the protagonist Mitchell’s warped thought processes masterfully exposed. The author has a powerful and vivid command of language, and his word pictures are stark and disturbingly real.”

– Linda J Bettenay, author of ‘Secrets Mothers Keep’ and ‘Wishes For Starlight’.

Redeeming Evil Characters

When it comes to lovable evil characters, Hannibal Lector is one I’d like to give one big ‘ol squeeze.

You can’t help but fall in love with the good Doctor’s wit, intellect and sense of propriety. If it weren’t for the odd liver and fava-bean request, you’d be happy to have him over for dinner, to charm and entertain, right?

Writing evil into any narrative comes with certain perils. Some discerning readers can’t abide free-flowing, mindless slashing and burning without an opposing force of goodness to balance it out. To restore sanity, authors give their evil a redeeming quality.

Pure Evil and Kindness

Hannibal Lector is a good example. He has just enough niceness to keep most lovers of dark fiction in-the-room. There’s a despicable element, but it’s offset by bags of amiability. It’s just not right for a character to be bad from sun up to sun down. No one can be that sinister and not have a lovable side tucked away somewhere.

A creative writer adds something extra for their character — the villain commits murder but visits animal shelters to care for orphaned kittens. Suddenly our fiend is likeable, accessible. There’s hope for them after all.

Mitchell Felding has redeeming traits of his own.

No one dies unless there’s an extremely good reason for them to do so. In fact, when he’s not ending a life, he’s helping someone remain alive. In one instance, he rescues a family from a rampaging thunderstorm that annihilates their entire home.

Mitchell’s second redeeming trait is closer to his heart. He adores his wife Samantha. He’ll do anything for her. He’s especially mindful of Samantha’s religious beliefs. Furthermore, he was the one who remained celibate for her while they dated. It wasn’t an easy time, but he kept his promise just as he said he would.

‘Not until I’m married,’ she told him between kisses.

Seven years was too long, but Mitchell loved Samantha. It just so happens that a dark element was seeded into their relationship — and the abstinence continued long after their nuptials were exchanged. The darkness continued to grow with it.

Mitchell has tried everything to chip at the ice, but nothing works. Sam and Mitchell are like oil and water. And now Sam has told her best friend that she and Mitchell are trying for a baby. A child? How can conception occur without intimacy? How can a couple remain best friends when they should be lovers?

The lies to maintain order are just too to much to bear. Something in Mitchell snaps.

I'm going slightly mad!

At first, Mitchell cheats on Sam for immediate gratification. Bored women from emotionally stifling marriages fulfil a basic need. Secretive, curious wives make the best candidates of all. The women, eager to take a break their humdrum’s routine, are attracted to his sense of adventure and candidness. Each agree to trying out his kink.

But sex only begins the process. Mitchell’s darker side wants a different kind of action. The seethed that feeds it runs deep. Rain washes away the intention, and the evidence. That’s convenient — for a serial killer who hides in plain sight.

SEETHINGS is dark, sensual fiction with a few twists along the way. The last one is explosive.

Michael

Five Random Victims
Summer Thunderstorms
Charm Bracelet
Author: M.Forman
Avail: Kindle, Kobo, Etc

“Forman’s writing style is artful, with the protagonist Mitchell’s warped thought processes masterfully exposed. The author has a powerful and vivid command of language, and his word pictures are stark and disturbingly real.”

– Linda J Bettenay, author of ‘Secrets Mothers Keep’ and ‘Wishes For Starlight’.

Great Heroes Require Quality Villains. They’re Compulsory.

Dark fiction does heroes a great big favour. Without a certain kind of evil to rise to the occasion, heroes can’t develop into what they are meant to become. Thank God for the darker elements of humanity and the baddest of bad-boys (or girls) to show us and our hero the way into the light.

What about the reverse storyline, y’know, the one where an ordinary hero loses to a fantastic villain, with evil winning the day and taking readers to the dark side?

Too hard to envision?

I could talk about mind-traits blocking the path to enlightenment — how our brains are wired to find the happy-ever-afters in the stories we hear and read. I’d include something about existentialism’s desire to fix problems whenever it sees a breakage in itself, but that’s not my job. Writing is my thing. My work is to tease out intriguing plots from ideas and turning long strings of words into entertainment. Dark fiction is my life. I live and breathe it. My quest is to create a villain who can be loved and hated with equal measure, with the reader accepting evil by the final page.

Are we talking of monsters, witches and the supernatural?

The only monster my writing contains is the one each of us carry around inside us. It dwells beneath an old part of our subconsciousness, and it just happens to be the most dangerous. If the conditions are right, this inner-creature is capable of broaching the upper-consciousness, reaching the surface and making it into this world. If you believe this is possible, then you too can accept the kind of evil I write.

SEETHINGS includes storms. Some are seen, others are felt. When they meet, a murder takes place. Police recognise the timing, but there are few other clues. It’s a mystery, but the greater mystery is why. The answer is deeply unsettling. It’s a crime that could’ve been committed by anyone. Even you.

Read SEETHINGS now.

Five Random Victims
Summer Thunderstorms
Charm Bracelet
Author: M.Forman
Avail: Kindle, Kobo, Kindle, iPad, Android.

Body Found In Bushland Near Beach – Fine Adult Fiction

Another woman’s naked body was discovered by bird watchers in the early hours of this morning. The body belongs to that of Verna Julenthorpe, 37, of Eagle Farm. She was last seen by friends yesterday afternoon. Her body was found on a naturalist’s boardwalk at Nudgee Beach at approximately 5.00am after a night of torrential thunderstorms. 

Police won’t speculate on her death and deny that this one has any link to the Storm Killer Murders reported in the media three years ago.

Despite the similarities between this and the five victims found in isolated areas of Brisbane’s outskirts, investigators are adamant that there are no connections. They’ve asked the community to remain calm.

Residents in the area have reported no suspicious activity in the area prior to the murder.

Joe Callim, a resident of Nudgee Beach, has a property adjacent to the forest that connects it to the beach where the body was located.

‘Yeah, sometimes we see headlights in the park and folks try to camp here overnight but something like this hasn’t happened before. It’s a quiet community. I can’t believe it.’

‘I doubt anyone would’ve heard her call out. The storm would’ve blocked out her screams,’ says resident.

Mr Callim continued, ‘If it happened during the storm [that we had last night] then no one would’ve known. The storms would’ve blocked out her screams. It poured so hard that I couldn’t even hear my tv.’

According to police, Mrs Julenthorpe appears to have driven herself to this location to take photographs. What she was photographing or happened to her after reaching the beach is still unknown.

Like the other victims three years ago, no attempt was made to conceal the body.


Hi! It’s me!

I spent many hours around Nudgee Beach, fishing, sailing and photographing the area. When I wrote SEETHINGS 2, I knew I wanted to see a murder committed there. It’s a perfect place for it.

It’s reasonably close to Brisbane but it’s an almost forgotten area.

I used to take students there. We’d stand on the mud-flats at low tide in the darkness waiting for the dawn light to color the sky. I’ve lost count of how many shoes I muddied over the years showing them how to capture the perfect sunrise shot!

Nudgee Beach - Another Picture Postcard
Nudgee Beach – A Picture Postcard

The walking trail mentioned in the novel is a real place too. My students enjoyed using it while shooting the birds that waded in the shallow waters for their early morning feeds.

Nudgee Beach - Picture Postcards
Glorious sunrises at Nudgee Beach

At night, romantic couples often meet in and around the beach, the car park and the nearby Mangrove Forest. (Some just enjoy watching a perfect moon rise across Moreton Bay.😉. How boring!)

Although the main car park is well lit, a smaller one that’s nearby isn’t. The forest trail that meanders it’s way through the mangroves and passes by a beach hasn’t any lights at all.

It’s possible that, when the conditions are right, visitors could come and go without being noticed.

And so a perfect murder scene is set, ready to be filled with intrigue. All I need to do is find a reason for two people to come together on a summer evening just before a thunderstorm.

In fiction, that’s not hard to do.

She uses dating sites to find part time lovers. He’s out shopping for another victim. Photography is their common interest. Both have their respective needs met near an isolated shoreline using photography as a ruse to meet.

A camera bag is found with her phone still inside it, minus its SIM card. (He uses it for something quite gross. You’ll have to read the novel to find out what it is.)

Okay, I’m evil and mentally sick. I get it… but I write for the neo-noir genre, right? It teeters between psychological thriller, horror, erotica and murder mystery. It’s supposed to be evil. That’s the deal.

So if you’re a sick person too, pick up a copy of my book for your reading displeasure. It’s available as a paperback or an e-book.

Michael Forman

A Sailing Affair
Two Random Victims
Childless Couple
Charm Bracelet
Author: M.Forman
Avail: e-Book

‘Forman’s writing style is artful, with the protagonist Mitchell’s warped thought processes masterfully exposed. The author has a powerful and vivid command of language and his word pictures are stark and disturbingly real.’

Linda J Bettenay, author of ‘Secrets Mothers Keep’ and ‘Wishes For Starlight’

Dark Adult Fiction (SEETHINGS). Character Spotlight: Super-Organised Samantha Felding.

Sam is a highly trustworthy, dependable woman — personable to all who encounter her. She’s a loyal friend, supportive sister and model daughter to her parents. Her work ethic is focused and flawless.

Samantha Felding.

  • Thirty-something
  • Married to Mitchell Felding (10 years.)
  • High School Educator
  • Self – Motivated
  • High Achiever
  • Dedicated Christian

Samantha remembers names, birthdays and anniversaries without prompts or notes. She reads the obituaries daily, just in case one someone she knows passes away. Sympathy cards are bought and sent via regular post frequently. Handwritten heartfelt messages always accompany them. Letters are written in long-hand, grammatically correct from the first word to the last.

There are calendars and clocks in every room of her home. A day planner sits on her desk, and she has three other diaries in the house. She has a plethora of reminder messages written on post-it notes which are stuck on a pin-board beside her computer. Not one second of her day is wasted on frivolous activities. She has organised everything within an inch of its life.

Some say she’s an old soul in a young body — too empathetic and disciplined to be a product of her generation. Winging-it isn’t in her vocabulary. There’s no such thing as making-it-up.

She’s a high-school teacher and very good at it. Her recent promotion to Department Head was a result of this officiousness. She deserved the appointment too. Those she works with, agree with the new placement and responsibilities.

She’s an intelligent, strong and independent woman. Ask her if she’s a feminist, and she’d answer with a resounding no. She’d simply say she was, getting the job done – a trait of humbleness she got from her mother.

Oh yes, that hard-working, quiet-achiever type is a nice trait, but it can fool the best of them. Husband Mitchell sees another side that isn’t shown to anyone else. Deep on the inside, Sam’s a mess. She’s conflicted with the pressures of modern life. She’s a professional woman struggling with the expectations of feminism, religion, and old-fashioned values against new-world demands. This comes at a price. It makes her doubt herself all the time. It also keeps her asking herself over and over: ‘Am I doing enough for God?’

She tries so hard not to disappoint Him. She’s got something to worry about every second of the day. Sugar can prompt a worrisome event. Brown or white sweetener for guests? Should it come in a bowl with a shared spoon and some stirrers, or is it proper to provide individual spoons at each place-setting? What if the coffee is too strong, or not strong enough? What if the discussion turns political while they’re drinking it? There should be a go-to topic just in case. Tea must be made available too. Artificial sweetener? Yes, some people are on diets.

It’s difficult to be Sam.

Needless to say, spontaneity threatens to ruin Sam’s carefully arranged world. Even Mitchell has to book-in to visit his wife. Sex is a somewhat frivolous activity, disorganised and messy. It’s last on Sam’s to-do list. That’s why, after a decade, the couple are childless and Mitchell has a taken up a new hobby.

Counsellor Tony Brindell is about to open Pandora’s Box by asking him one simple question.

Michael

“Forman’s writing style is artful, with the protagonist Mitchell’s warped thought processes masterfully exposed. The author has a powerful and vivid command of language, and his word pictures are stark and disturbingly real.”

– Linda J Bettenay, author of ‘Secrets Mothers Keep’ and ‘Wishes For Starlight’.

Amateur Photographers Discover Body

What are you looking at? I'm not a real reporter. Got you!

Reporter: Julie Sephlia

MF News & Media


Logan City: Two Meadowbrook photography TAFE students taking a walk this morning, discovered a woman’s near naked body in low-lying grass on the banks of the Logan River.

A stock Logan City shot for trainers

Charlene Foley, 38 of Kingston, was last seen on Wednesday night after she told her husband she was going for a walk for fresh air. She never returned.

Logan City Police have released the following statement:

‘Mrs Foley appears to have left her Kingston address at about seven thirty on the night of the 15th and then made her way along Juers Street.’

‘We believe she met someone, relocating to a Meadowbrook address soon thereafter. There were sounds of a struggle on Juers Street, and we’re currently looking for a white sedan that was seen in the area around that time. We are also searching for her mobile phone’s SIM card.’

‘Cadets from Oxley Academy will be doing a ground search today, retracing her movements along the river, Armstrong Rd and its surrounds.’

Photography student Len Skapp who discovered the body said, ‘We were photographing birds and I said to John what’s that in the background? I thought it was someone sunbathing in the grass.’

Mrs Foley leaves behind two daughters and a son.


Len Skapp? Surely you didn’t believe that oddball name, did you?

I didn’t write it into the book like that. That’s a serious adult piece inside there. Len Skapp is just a spontaneous name l came up with for this post for fun.

Naughty me.

Please enjoy what was put into my slightly deranged, neo-noir styled novels now. 😉

Michael

A Sailing Affair
Two Random Victims
Childless Couple
Charm Bracelet
Author: M.Forman
Avail: eBook

“Forman’s writing style is artful, with the protagonist Mitchell’s warped thought processes masterfully exposed. The author has a powerful and vivid command of language, and his word pictures are stark and disturbingly real.”

– Linda J Bettenay, author of ‘Secrets Mothers Keep’ and ‘Wishes For Starlight’.