Neo-Noir Erotica. The New Black In Dark Storytelling. SEETHINGS.

Vanilla eroticism is known for its predictable plots. Romantics call them happy-ever-afters. Outcomes are expected. Clichéd plots are guaranteed. Someone’s manly chest meets someone’s perfect eyes and hair, and only names and situations change. Couples find their right type of Utopia by The End. Nice. Boring.

Neo-noir erotica is edgier than it’s softer counterparts. It’s arousing and unsettling. A narrative rarely takes a clichéd path or closes the way you’d expect an erotica-story to end. Love, justice, righteousness, good-over-bad, a love-that-conquers-all plot courses don’t easily fit into this genre, not in a conventional way anyway. If you go looking for a HEA, you may find one, but you’ll need to skew your head sideways to see it. Sex is used to tell a broader, deep-seated story from our darker sides. That side seeks a happy-ever-after too and it’s version isn’t so obvious, much less accepted.

When writing SEETHINGS, I purposely lured the reader into my book with a conventional approach to eroticism and then reshaped it. Okay, that part’s easy to digest. It allows this writer’s text to earn some keep. The characters then move together, feeding off their lusts and fears, devouring each other like lovers do — but then one oversteps the mark and a shadow climbs into bed with them. Something is wrong. Sex is in the story, but it’s not always its motive.

Every word in this chapter was crafted to get our lovers together, driven by what drives lust. It’s passionate and electric. It flows well, and I’m proud of how arousing it turned out to be. My toes curl a little thinking about it. The challenge was adding a third character and spoiling the natural order of things. That shadow I mentioned earlier in this post? Working it into the couple’s intimacy was a real challenge. The ending is kind of happy — for an unseen shadow. What about our lovers?

Read SEETHINGS now to unsettle all your thoughts on traditional erotica.

M

“Forman’s writing style is artful, with the protagonist Mitchell’s warped thought processes masterfully exposed. The author has a powerful and vivid command of language, and his word pictures are stark and disturbingly real.”

– Linda J Bettenay, author of ‘Secrets Mothers Keep’ and ‘Wishes For Starlight’.

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